Finding Common Ground

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A highlight of a recent visit to Chicago was walking through Millennium Park, a magnificent 2004 expansion of public space near Lake Michigan. Built with both public dollars and significant corporate support, it has become a major gathering place for Chicago residents as well as a leading tourist destination. Millennium Park is also a real focus of civic pride for Chicagoans.

It’s a vivid demonstration of the value of public space in large cities and of the foresight that generations of leaders in Chicago showed in preserving the lakefront for parks and recreation. Other cities–and you know who you are–squandered the opportunity years ago to create similar kinds of public space along their rivers and harbors.

Public space brings people together, whether for concerts, wandering through gardens, peering at outdoor sculptures, or just providing a place to decompress from the trials of daily life. Perhaps most significantly, the fact that public space is available to everyone regardless of whatever category they are generally placed in underscores the importance of community.

I’m certainly not asserting that a public park is a substitute for dealing with the perplexing issues of urban education, crime and poverty. However, if we were able to see that we actually have a common stake in addressing those challenges in the same way as we appreciate the pleasures of shared public space, we might make some progress.

In fact, you might well trace the current rancor and division in our society and politics to the growing emphasis on self rather than on community. That’s always been a tension in this country, but the pendulum has lurched toward unrestrained individualism in recent years.

The unwillingness of some people to pay taxes to pay for support common services, infrastructure and basic needs has had dire consequences. Crumbling roads, bridges and utilities are taken as too expensive to repair or replace. We shortchange our public schools to the detriment of the whole society. Some elected officials are very ready to send Americans off to wars, but unwilling to pay for veterans services when they return. The less fortunate among us are told that it’s their fault that they weren’t born to a family of means.

Our politics, as shown in the ugly and often racist behavior in Cleveland at the Republican National Convention, has sunk to new lows. The rabid mob at the Convention didn’t see victory in the election as adequate; they shouted for Hillary Clinton to be locked up or even executed. That’s not how people in democratic societies act, but the party of Donald Trump shows no shame at its excesses and its abandonment of the values on which this country was founded.

The party’s nominee gave a speech on Thursday night that was intended to terrify every voter in the country in the hope that many of them would turn to him as the strongman who would make everything right.

In the midst of that spasm of emotion, some Republican leaders have not capitulated to the madness and have been willing to put country ahead of party. In future years, when a grandchild asks what you did during the Era of Trump, there will be a clear division between those who can hold their heads up high and those who will have no response other than shame.

Trump’s Convention highlighted the worst in America.  It was, for anyone who sees the value of community and sharing, a truly depressing week.  I’m counting on the Democrats at their Convention in Philadelphia to demonstrate a strikingly different tone and appeal.  Until then, I will take comfort in my memories of Millennium Park as a positive sign of what our better instincts can accomplish.